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The Secret to Understanding Native Speakers of English

Understand Native Speakers

So many learners tell me:

I find it difficult to understand native English speakers.

In the video and article below, I’m going to tell you why!

THE FIRST 2 REASONS WHY YOU CAN’T UNDERSTAND NATIVE SPEAKERS

These two are obvious but important.

  1. You don’t understand the words that people say (vocabulary)
  2. You don’t understand the meaning of the sentence (grammar)

For example, if someone says: He’s obnoxious and you don’t know what obnoxious means, then you won’t understand what someone is saying.

If someone says: If I had more time, I would do it and you don’t know how to use the second conditional, then you won’t understand what that person is saying.

Rule 1: You need to know vocabulary and grammar in order to understand what someone is saying.

Again, this is obvious. Let’s move on…

IF YOU UNDERSTAND THE WORDS AND THE GRAMMAR BUT STILL HAVE PROBLEMS…

… the reason why you don’t understand what native speakers are saying is because of the way they talk.

This could be:

  1. Because of their accent
  2. Because native speakers use relaxed pronunciation, contractions, and they link words together

We’re going to focus on number two.

RELAXED PRONUNCIATION

Instead of saying I’m going to go, people usually say I’m gonna go.

I made a lesson on this here.

This is very common in spoken English.

Other examples:

  • Did you? = Didja?
  • Want to = wanna
  • Have to = hafta
  • Got to = gotta

Here is the video on the last example:

As you can see, this is common and you need to be aware of this to understand native speakers.

CONTRACTIONS

You already know some of these:

  • I will not = I won’t
  • I should have = I should’ve
  • He is = he’s

There are many others too.

People use these during spoken English and, again, it’s important to be aware of these.

Sometimes, these contractions change further.

For example: should have = should’ve = shoulda

Here is a video on that:

LINKING

Instead of hearing I really want to go now as separate words, you will hear:

I reallywannagonow instead.

Native speakers link words together so that, when they speak, two or more words sound like one word.

In the video above, I gave a few examples of this. Here are some more:

  • I wanted it = I wantedit
  • Stop it = stopit
  • this afternoon = thisafternoon

This can be difficult to understand. Knowing this will help you greatly when it comes to comprehension.

INTONATION, RHYTHM & STRESS

It’s worth mentioning that these parts of speech play a big part too, especially when it comes to subtle meaning.

For example:

  1. I told her to do it
  2. I told her to do it

In the first example, I am emphasizing that she was the one I told. In the second example, I am emphasizing that it was me who

In the second example, I am emphasizing that it was me who told her to do it.

HOW TO UNDERSTAND NATIVE SPEAKERS

So, I’ve explained why you have problems understanding native English speakers but what you can do to improve?

I recommend that you:

  1. Keep improving your vocabulary
  2. Keep improving your understanding of grammar
  3. Learn how speakers link words together and use relaxed pronunciation

Luckily, I have a method that will do all three.

I call it the LRRC Method and it’s simple to use:

  1. Find sentences in audio format
  2. Listen to them
  3. Repeat them and record your voice
  4. Compare your version to the original and make changes
  5. Get lots of repetiton

I have a free introduction to this tutorial here.

However, I have everything you need including the materials inside my program.

There is a section on pronunciation where you will learn all about how words link together, relaxed pronunciation, vowel sounds, the schwa and much more.

Then, I show you how to use this powerful method and give you audio to download so that you can use this method from anywhere.

English learners from around the world are using this method to improve their vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, speaking, and their ability to understand native speakers of English.

So…

 

 

  • John Vicary

    You post reads like my set of videos